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Friday, February 25, 2011

Waffle Crochet Tutorial - From Blankets to Dishcloths


You may remember in the Wash Your Washcloths post a dish cloth featured and I said I would show you the stitch....
Here 'tis.
It's my all time go to for blankets. I know the granny is an old time favourite and looks really retro at the moment and it is OK for a climate like QLD, but this waffle type construction traps warm air and provides the cosiest rug of really robust construction.
Ideal for the Tasmanian conditions.
The best thing is there are very few rules and I find it uses up scrap wool effectively.
If you want to make a dish cloth, use pure cotton and those lovely scrubby ridges give just the grunt you need on some of the tough jobs. Maybe it takes a little longer to dry out but since you wash your cloths every day (Right?) that is not really a drama.


For rugs, use whatever you want to use up. (Do you see that variegated brown wool in the foreground there? I can remember buying that in Gladstone when I was in Gr 4/5 back in about 1975)
These are great for watching TV or emergency back up in the car.
Whether you make a single or a king size, it's up to you and how many chain stitches you do.


Even my edge was done with scrap. Leave plain or finish with a scallop edge.
So here is the step by step with LOTS of pictures because, I think I've told you before, I'm a visual person and it's easier for me to show rather than rely purely on words and instruction.

The crochet terms I use are Australian/English

(but I'm sure the Americans will figure out what they need to call the stitches)

Make a chain.....
and keep making it for as wide as you want the article to be.
For beds I always err on the side of caution and do a bit more than I think and I am never disappointed this way.
The first three stitches after you have turned are your first treble (tr)
So go ahead and make a tr in the 4th stitch there.
Now keep tr into every chain (ch) till you get to the end.

Like this.
Now turn around and go back the other way doing this...
Make 3ch (that counts as your first tr and will ever after on every row be the same)
So make a tr into the top of the very next tr.
Now here is where it gets special

Now make a tr but instead of going into the top of the next tr, go behind it.
Now do it again.
So far you have 3ch, 1 tr into the top of the 2nd tr and you have tr into the behind of the very next 2.
Continue along the row making a tr into the top of the next 2 tr and tr into the backs of the next 2.
2 in the tops, 2 in the backs
(Don't stress if you have an odd number once you get to the end, just keep to the pattern.)

Turn again and go back the other way, making your 3 ch
The very next stitch you will do is a tr into the back (see how that 2nd tr below is a sticky-outy type stitch? That tells you it's a tr behind)

The next 2 are into the top and the 2 after that are behind and so on and so forth till the end.

So you've got it now. It's making little pockets. It's all you'll ever do is those three chain stitches at the start of every row and then trebles either into the tops or behind. If you forget where you are up to, just look at the stitch you're about to go into,
Is it straight up or a bit stuck out.
Straight up...into the top.
Stuck out...into the behind.

Back and forth for as long as your heart desires or your bed length is gained.
Let me know if you have any trouble following this and I would love to see any projects made.

My sister-in-law has kindly pointed out that my blankets were done with one treble behind and two in the top rather than two and two. Either way is suitable. Should have got her to proof read - she is very talented and has a precise eye for detail. Thanks Leeann.

29/01/15
This pattern has kindly loaded on Ravelry and some project makers have made great notations about hook sizes and yarn and yardage so I am adding the url which many of you will find helpful. If you have also completed a project load it on the Ravelry page too!
http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/waffle-crochet-tutorial/people

58 comments:

  1. Truly, truly lovely! I can't wait to get started!

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  2. I have been trying to find that pattern for my dishcloths and thank you I know have it.

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  3. Great tutorial; the pictures make it really easy to follow. many thanks!

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  4. A truely wonderful pattern! I fancy a whole batch of washcloths in this - now to find some nice cottons in the stash to do your tutorial justice :)
    thanks for sharing Tanya - ever thought of running a crochet class .....

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  5. P.S. my hand ache looking at all of your beautiful blankets - how many hours in each of them just dazzles me !

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  6. I can't wait to try this one. Ever tried Bavarian crochet? I'm working on that one and it produces a very interesting pattern.

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  7. I started it! I was making 2 back post and then 2 front post though. I didn't get far yet so I can fix it. Do you always start with 2 tops or do you alternate your rows?

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  8. The trick is to simply look at the post you are about to crochet into. *If it looks straight up then you crochet into the top. If it looks bulged out and away from the piece then go in behind.
    Or another way to look at it, what was a bedind post on the previous row will be a top post on the next row.
    I can't say "always start your row with..." as it depends upon how many chain stitches and thus trebles you have.
    My best advice is to free yourself from the concept of a written pattern. You are following a formula instead. You are making waffles from a set of four stitches and you are moving across a row following the rule*
    I hope you can get the hang of it because it is super easy when you grasp it and super warm and strong.

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    Replies
    1. Tanya..thank you so much for generously sharing this beautiful pattern...I had it years ago but lost mine...
      FYI..as you know your sister in law is right ...2 are a called front post double crochet and next 2 are in double crochet in top...American speak of course lol..
      LOVE IT!

      Thanks again,

      Camilla

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    2. Front Post triple crochet (FPtc)
      Back Post triple crochet (BPtc)
      :-)

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  9. that is genius! I've been obsessing over waffle weave on the loom recently, and to see something so very similar in crochet blows my mind. I definitely need to give it a go, thanks!

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  10. I like that waffle pattern!! I don't crochet much as I'd rather knit but I sent it to my daughter over at Interweave Press Crochet magazine. She is the online editor. Really nice how to photos.

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  11. Such a great tutorial ... I'm very new to crochet but will give this a whirl!

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  12. I am so excited to have found this tutorial! Thank you so much Tanya! I adore the waffle. Can't wait to give it a go.

    Sally Oakley (@SallyRavels)

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  13. Great tutorial Tanya and very well explained!

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  14. I'm very tardy in finding you and this post...but I happened upon it in Pinterest and was ever so intrigued. I tried and ripped and tried again and ripped again, beginning last night. Finally figured out what I was doing wrong on a third try this morning! I LOVE THIS! You're so right, once one finally gets it, it's super easy and what a fun, comfy blankie! I made a trial square just to be sure I had it all down - and have now started a blanket of proper sorts. So excited to get on with it! I've ALWAYS been in love with anything waffle weave! Thanks so much! Annette

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  15. I just saw this on Pinterest too and it looks so neat! I haven't been crocheting long so I'm hoping someone can explain this to me... My waffles are rectangular not square, basically every two rows are forming a waffle and it looks like you are forming a waffle with every row. Any idea what I'm doing wrong?

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  16. MUTiger - it does take two rows to make a waffle complete. I'm wondering if you are crocheting the return row properly? If a treble is sitting proud, crochet behind it (put your hook behind the treble rather than into the top of) and then crochet into the tops of the normal sitting trebles. Good luck. It's a bit hard to know without a photo, keep trying because it is worth it if you get the hang of it. Tanya x

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    1. I think I'm doing the stitches correctly, but my stitches look taller than yours. I tried to add a picture but there is no way to do so. I'll keep trying and I'll get it eventually! Thank you!

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    2. Ah! That makes some sense. Are you American? I am Australian and the instructions say treble which I think for you in America is a double crochet, that could be why your stitches are so tall.

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    3. That makes so much sense!! I am American and looked up a treble and thought it said a triple stitch... Double will work so much better!! I'm so excited! Thanks for your help!!

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  17. I bought some wonderful yarn awhile back and have been looking for a good texture crochet stitch. I saw this on Pintrest and can't wait to try it out! Like MUTiger, I'm also American so am glad I read to the bottom of the thread before starting! Thanks so much! I'll likely "practice" with a dishcoth first.

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  18. What weight and fiber yarn do you like best? Worsted? Cotton? Acrylic blend?

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    1. I only work in pure wool for blankets and I prefer an 8ply - 12ply. When doing a scrap blanket I will even use up 5ply by using it double stranded. The blankets are very forgiving if you mix it up a bit.

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  19. Wonderful! Thanks so much for sharing it!

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  20. Thanks so much for the tute! Between this pattern in American terms (http://www.lionbrand.com/patterns/80986AD.html?noImages=&r=1) and your picture tutorial, I think I've got this. I kept putting my dc and fpdc (American dc is the same as Australian/English tr) in the wrong spot when I was working the wrong side of the pattern till I came across your post on Pinterest. Thank you thank you!!

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  21. I have a question...how much yarn would you use for a baby blanket?

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  22. I have a question...how much yarn would you use for a baby blanket?

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  23. Hi Tanya.. Just wanted to say that this stitch is really lovely and I intend to 'give it a go'. By the way... I am also a 'Launcestonian' Lol but at Newstead.. Hope you have a great new year.. :)

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  24. Just found this on pinterest - what a great tutorial - thank you! I'm an avid hooker and this one is new to me!!!

    gena

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  25. I too just found this on Pinterest and I love it. I think I like the one stitch - two stitch pattern like your pictures. I can't wait to use this pattern for a little boy's blanket I'm getting ready to start. Thanks for sharing.

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  26. I am making a blanket using this stitch and am trying to figure out how much yarn to buy any formula you might have?

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  27. I am making a blanket using this stitch and am trying to figure out how much yarn to buy any formula you might have?

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    1. Sorry I have no idea how much yarn as I have always made them with scraps and just bought oddments on sale to add.

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  28. I made an afghan using this pattern and it is incredible. Made mine all brown with beige stripes at each end. Awesome! thank you for the tutorial!

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  29. My blanket was 65x55 and I used 9 7oz skeins of U.S. 4 ply if it helps anyone!

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    1. What a champion you are Annamaria, I'm sure that will be helpful for people to kmow. If you want to email me a picture I would love to add it to the end of the post.

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  30. I would like to know what size hook you used when you worked on the blanket in the very first picture. Thanks a bunch! - Julie

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    1. Hi Julie, couldn't answer your question via email sorry so hope this catches you here. About the crochet hook size??? I really don't remember but it would have to be about a 4.00mm that would be my best guess and the wool ply ranges from 8ply to 12ply (or even double stranded 7ply!). Hope that helps.

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  31. I have a question. When you say you make a treble "in the back" of the stitch, what do you mean? Is it just the top back, or is it literally behind it? Every way I try doesn't look right.

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    1. So another way to describe it I guess would be to go around the actual post of the treble. There is one picture above that I think depicts it very well. Have a look at the 12th photo. I can see that I might also have to do my first ever You Tube clip to go along with this tutorial. Hope this helps Katie. Cheers

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  33. Excellent tutorial. I really appreciate it, I haven´t seen it before. Thank you

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  34. I would really like this shown in a video..I can follow a video better..I am confused...nice stitch though and I am looking for a new stitch...

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    1. I realize this is almost a year from original post but YouTube.com has videos for everything...

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  35. Gorgeous Tanya! Thanks for sharing this, I look forward to giving it a go. Coincidentally a you tube channel I subscribe to posted a vid on how to do a crochet waffle a day or two after you left your comment on my blog! So I think the universe is trying to tell me something. I only ever knew this as a knit pattern but I love the prominence of the ridges you get with the crochet version!

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  36. Hi Tanya, could you tell me what size wool and hook you used for your blankets? I'm new to crochet but I'm going to tackle a blanket. I live in QLD, duo think I could do it in cotton? Thanks heaps! LOVE this stitch/blanket!! :)

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    1. I usually use about 4mm or 4.5mm hook for 8ply yarn but whatever suits you. I think cotton crochets up differently to wool and if you had an equivalent to 8ply in cotton I would probably use a smaller hook for a denser effect. Cotton can lack a bit of body but then again it depends on the quality you buy. I used to make these from acrylic when I lived in QLD.

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    2. That's why I asked :). I'm using a 4mm hook with 8ply good quality cotton yarn and it's a lot less dense than the pictures in your post. I'll try with a smaller hook and see how I go. Thanks for the response. :)

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  37. hi, I want to make a blanket for a baby ... can you give a link on how to do the type of treble stitch you use here? I notice there is some confusion with a higher type of American stitch: I just know I'll get it wrong and use the wrong one and stuff it up otherwise ...

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    1. Try this Youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1txJLRPfuE

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  39. How many chaind did you do evenly to make your pretty colorful blanket?

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    1. Oh I'm sorry I have no idea how many after all these years. I just keep making chains till it looks the right size when draped over a bed or lap.

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  40. Thank you, thank you! I've been trying to figure out the waffle stitch....and you made it easy!

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  41. je suis très heureuse découvrir ce site afin d"avoir une autre performance et de voir d"autre modèles que je n"ais jamais vu merci merci beaucoup

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  42. This is very beautiful and creative. Thank you so much for sharing. I really like the way you explained the things. Its worth to visit this blog. oriental rugs for sale

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